BROWSE CATEGORIES

Foam Concentrates

Firefighting foam concentrates are developed for putting out large or aggressive fires where water would be ineffective and/or dangerous. There are different types of foam concentrates, each with its own application. Low-expansion foams have an expansion rate less than 20 times such as AFFF are low-viscosity, mobile, and able to quickly cover large areas. Medium-expansion foams have an expansion ratio between 20 and 200. High-expansion foams have an expansion ratio over 200. They are suitable for enclosed spaces such as hangars, where quick filling is needed.  

Alcohol-resistant foams contain a polymer that forms a protective layer between the burning surface and the foam, preventing foam breakdown by alcohols in the burning fuel. Alcohol-resistant foams should be used in fighting fires of fuels containing oxygenates, or fires of liquids based on or containing polar solvents.

Aqueous film forming foam more commonly known as AFFF is low-expansion, low-viscosity foam that is able to quickly cover large areas. AFFF foams comes in many variants such as AFFF 1%, AFFF 3%, AFFF 6 % plus there are specific names for differing types of AFFF foams produced by different foam manufactures.

Aqueous film forming foam - Alcohol resistant concentrate mostly known as AFFF ARC but are also known as alcohol resistant foam, polar solvent foam and alcohol foam. Like AFFF foam AFFF ARC foam comes in many different versions such as AFFF ARC 3x3, AFFF ARC 3x6, AFFF ARC 1x1. International fire fighting foam manufactures use different names and coding for its AFFF ARC foams.

Class A foams are for use against Class A fires such as paper, rubber, textiles and wood.  Class Foams can be also known as wetting agents and wild fire foams as they are very effective fighting wild land fires. Class A foams are often intended for use at very low concentration of 0,1 to 1%, and are formulated using environmentally favourable raw materials. Class A foams are blend of surfactants that enable strong wetting and foaming properties.

Film forming fluoro protein most often known as FFFP foam come in lots of different types including FFFP 3% and FFFP 6%. FFFP foams can also be called film forming and fluoro protein foams. International fire fighting foam manufactures use different names and coding for their FFFP foams.

Film forming fluoro protein - Alcohol resistant concentrate mostly known as FFFP ARC but are also known as alcohol resistant foam, polar solvent foam, alcohol resistant concentrate and alcohol foam. Like FFFP foam FFFP ARC foam comes in many different versions such as FFFP ARC 3x3, FFFP ARC 3x6, FFFP ARC 1x1. International fire fighting foam manufactures use different names and coding for its AFFF ARC foams.

Fluorine free fire fighting foams are free from fluorinated surfactants and polymers and are predominantly synthetic based foams based on surfactant blends and in many cases the use of polysaccharides. Fluorine free foams can also be known as 3F Foams.

Synthetic Multi Purpose Foams are mainly fire extinguishing foams based on surfactants. Synthetic multi purpose foams are suitable for generating low, medium and high expansion foam. Synthetic Multi Purpose foams can also be used as wetting agents as they reduce the surface tension of water.

Protein Foams & Fluoro Protein Foams . Protein foam commonly known as P foam is based on protein hydrolysate and is a fluorine free foam. Fluoro protein foam commonly known as FP foam is like Protein foam based on protein hydrolysate but with a small amount of fluoro surfactant which increases the extinguishing efficiency of the foam.

Premix Foam Solutions are used by companies to obtain a longer shelf life of ready to use fire fighting foam solutions. Different fire fighting foam manufactures use different names and coding for its premix foam solutions.

Training foams allow fire fighters to train with fire fighting foams  in a realistic situations.  Training foams mimic the properties of actual firefighting foams used in real life knock down by firefighters such as AFFF or FPPP foams. The two key advantages of training foams is the low cost, they cost substantially less that frontline fire fighting foams. The other main advantage is they are fluorine free foams that have minimal impact on the environment.

Simulation foams are similar to training foams as they are environmentally friendly and react in the same way with the same flow behaviour as traditional foam concentrate. Simulation foams are mostly used when commissioning and testing fixed foam systems.